National Trust Purbeck Wildlife


Leave a comment

Harmless Hornet

Hornet hoverfly at Knoll Beach

Hornet hoverfly at Knoll Beach

Hoverflies, exquisite creatures that are important pollinators of many flowers and whose larvae often feed on plant pests, are usually either overlooked or mistaken for stinging insects.

But one species that is hard to overlook when insect watching, but definitely mistaken for a stinger, is the hornet hoverfly.

At almost 2cm long, the hornet is the largest and most impressive hoverfly in Britain. As its name suggests, it is an excellent mimic of the Hornet, so keeping predators such as birds away, but lacks a sting.

Only a very rare visitor to the country up to the 1940s, in recent years it has become more common in southern England and is still spreading northwards, perhaps as a result of the warmer climate. The adults are migratory so this is a good time to look for them on late-flowering buddleia.


Leave a comment

Anyone for Cricket?

Anyone for cricket?

Great green bush-cricket

Great green bush-cricket

We often hear the various chirping, trilling and buzzing of crickets and grasshoppers at this time of year but finding them, let alone catching them, is a great challenge that quickly brings back childhood memories. So I couldn’t resist when this spectacular great green bush-cricket, the sword-shaped ovipositor indicating a female, appeared beside a grassy path at Middle Beach.

Despite being by far our largest bush-cricket, the expert camouflage of the great green makes them hard to spot though males can be located by their very loud ‘song’, produced by rubbing a hind leg against a wing, that sounds like a sewing machine going continuously for long periods.

However, the song of some species, for example the widespread speckled bush-cricket, is so high pitched that it cannot be heard by most people. One useful method for finding these is by scanning with a bat detector because, just as with bats, the device makes their sounds audible.